Alice Highet is an artist who gives form to technological daydreams. She pays attention to fleeting moments: a shadow on a wall or light hitting water, where time seems to shift and slow down. She imagines interactions with technology that allow space for creative, self-generated, embodied internal experiences.

Her work creates heightened sensory awareness through psychedelic abstract video and sound, inviting a digital hug. Referencing the history of technology through optical devices, she uses ephemeral porous screens made from paper and net, reflective mobiles, and handmade filters to sculpt light. Her work draws on embodied practices and uses changes of scale to bring attention to the body. Senses are further activated through tactile imagery, alongside sounds from nature, analogue instruments, and electronic sounds. These physical and digital elements blur, echoing internal states such as daydreams and meditation, which are bodily yet allusive and hard to grasp.

Alice has shown her work at Baltic Gateshead, Lumen London and been selected by MIMA for Middlesbrough Art Week. She was shortlisted for North East Emerging Artist Award 2021 with National Trust and curator Matthew Jarratt. She has an MA in Visual Culture (Distinction) from Durham University and is currently completing an AHRC funded creative-practice PhD at Newcastle University. Her PhD Research asks ‘how can multimedia arts practice imagine new habitual technological modes of interaction which prioritise human care and wellbeing.’

She has 20 years’ experience as an artist-educator (PGCE), including teaching community workshops and leading workshops for Durham University and Newbridge Project. She taught in HE for 8 years at The Northern School of Art. She is an Associate Fellow of Advanced HE and currently teaches at Newcastle University on BA Hons Fine Art, art histories and as a studio tutor.

For a full CV or to get in touch: alicehighet@googlemail.com 

 

 

 

 

 

Credits:

This website has been funded by a micro bursary from Auxiliary and Arts Council.
Photography credits: Matt Pickering, Steven Landles.